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NEW ON DVD: Flawlessly-acted ‘20th Century Women’ examines life during the 1970s

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WRITTEN BY AMY LONGSDORF  
For Digital First Media

For his follow-up to “Beginners,” writer/director Mike Mills uncorks “20th Century Women” (2016, Lionsgate, R, $20), a lovely, flawlessly-acted valentine to a single mom who’s so cool she’d give Lorelei Gilmore a run for her money.
Set in 1979, this autobiographical dramedy revolves around the teenage Jamie (Lucas Jade Zumann) as he tries to figure out what he wants out of life. He has plenty of exceptional role models, including his bohemian feminist mother (Annette Bening), his best friend (Elle Fanning) and a punk-loving boarder (Greta Gerwig).
Most filmmakers would lavish their attention on Jamie but Mills is more interested in the deliciously complicated women who surround him. Bening, in particular, gives “20th Century Women” a beautiful glow. Extras: featurettes and commentary by Mills.
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