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NEW ON DVD: Viola Davis shines in ‘Fences’

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WRITTEN BY AMY LONGSDORF
For Digital First Media

For his third directorial outing, Denzel Washington unleashes at least some of the power of August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play about a Pittsburgh family in the 1950s.
In “Fences” (2016, Paramount, PG-13, $30), patriarch Troy (Washington) is married to Rose (Viola Davis) but stepping out with another woman. Washington huffs and puffs as Troy but for all the bombast, he fails to humanize a man battling a bevy of demons.
The Oscar-winning Davis fares much better as a woman who won’t allow herself to be devastated by Troy’s betrayals. Individual scenes have a bruising power but “Fences” remains too stagey to be as stirring as it should be. Extras: featurettes.
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