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NEW TO DVD: ‘Bad Moms’ uncorks a raucous good time

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STORY BY AMY LONGSDORF
For Digital First Media

Three cheers for “Bad Moms” (2016, Universal, R, $30), a raucous comedy about an over-worked suburbanite (Mila Kunis) who has grown weary of trying to be the perfect mom.

Along with her new besties (Kristen Bell, Kathryn Hahn), she decides to cut loose and have some fun. Written and directed by “Hangover” scripters Jon Lucas and Scott Moore, “Bad Moms” uncorks one giddy scene after another, as the moms wreak havoc in a grocery store, take on the PTA Queen Bee (Christina Applegate) and do Jell-O shots with Martha Stewart.
Best of all, “Bad Moms” is a showcase for all of the women involved. And, boy, do they rock it. Extras: gag reel, deleted scenes and featurettes.

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