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Viggo Mortensen is ‘Captain Fantastic’: Playing a free-spirited father of six living off the grid, the actor delivers a powerful performance

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STORY WRITTEN BY AMY LONGSDORF
For Digital First Media

Viggo Mortensen delivers one of the finest performance of his career in “Captain Fantastic” (2016, Universal, R, $30), the saga of a free spirit who goes off the grid, taking his six kids with him.
After his wife’s suicide, Mortensen comes out of seclusion, which leads to confrontations with his sister-in-law (Kathryn Hahn) and father-in-law (Frank Langella). While writer/director Matt Ross might romanticize the pleasures of living in the woods of the Pacific Northwest, he creates a family which is believable down to the last detail.
And it’s hard to top the sight of kids more interested in celebrating Noah Chomsky’s birthday than playing video games. Extras: featurettes.

PHOTO BY CATHY KANAVY — COURTESY OF Bleecker Street @PH Caption:From left, Shree Crooks stars as Zaja, Viggo Mortensen as Ben, Samantha Isler as Kielyr, Nicholas Hamilton as Rellian, Annalise Basso as Vespyr, George MacKay as Bo and Charlie Shotwell as Nai in “Captain Fantastic.”

PHOTO BY CATHY KANAVY — COURTESY OF Bleecker Street
@PH Caption:From left, Shree Crooks stars as Zaja, Viggo Mortensen as Ben, Samantha Isler as Kielyr, Nicholas Hamilton as Rellian, Annalise Basso as Vespyr, George MacKay as Bo and Charlie Shotwell as Nai in “Captain Fantastic.”

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