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Philadelphia Honey Festival held over three days at three different venues

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STORY WRITTN BY BRIAN BINGAMAN
bbingaman@21st-centurymedia.com
@brianbingaman on Twitter

Celebrating its seventh year, the Philadelphia Honey Festival returns Sept. 9, 10 and 11 at three sites in different parts of Philadelphia.
This year, the Philadelphia Beekeepers Guild (PBG) welcomes Glen Foerd on the Delaware in the northeast as a new partner, joining Wyck in the Germantown area and Bartram’s Garden in southwest Philly.
“Honey Festival is really our biggest public education event,” said Kathy May, a second-year beekeeper and PBG board member. “The guild itself raises awareness of honey bees and educates beekeepers and non-beekeepers.”

Honey extractions are one of the highlights of the Philadelphia Honey Festival. Submitted photo

Honey extractions are one of the highlights of the Philadelphia Honey Festival.
Submitted photo

Note that you’ll be going to a different destination each day if you want to make a weekend out of it. “Honey Happy Hour” is 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9 at Glen Foerd on the Delaware, at Grant Avenue and Milnor Street. “Honey Happy Hour” will feature food demos and appetizers by Jamie Hollander Catering, plus honey-based beer and a bee-bearding demonstration by Don Shump, the president of the PBG and owner of the Philadelphia Bee Co. Inside the mansion, children are invited to take part in crafts and activities, while lawn games and beekeeping demonstrations happen along the riverside. Suggested donation is $10, $5 for those under 21.
Wyck Historic House, Garden and Farm, 6026 Germantown Ave., hosts a full day of events 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10. Special features include a “Home Brewing with Honey” event in the Rose Garden and a mead contest. Home brewers of the fermented honey wine drink get a free professional critique, courtesy of The Colony Meadery of Allentown, then sip and share each other’s entries. Activities also include honey tastings, extractions, bee-themed children’s activities, a bee-bearding grand finale and a presentation on “Bees, Trees and Other Species.”

\1004691021 Don Bee Beard Plonski.jpg Don Plonski is brave enough to wear a bee beard. Submitted photo

\1004691021 Don Bee Beard Plonski.jpg
Don Plonski is brave enough to wear a bee beard.
Submitted photo

Bartram’s Garden at 54th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard, hosts the final day of the festival 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11. Special features include the children’s “Be-A-Bee” costume parade, a native plants sale, a marketplace with local crafts, beer and mead sampling with Philly Homebrew Outlet, and cooking demonstrations with the Cooking with Honey Contest winners. Deb Delaney of the University of Delaware will give a presentation in laymen’s terms on colony collapse disorder. “That’s a name assigned to a particular phenomenon 10 years ago in the beekeeping world where there were empty hives and no bees in them,” May explained.
According to www.phillyhoneyfest.com, average attendance each of the last three years was 2,300 people.
The Philadelphia Honey Festival began in 2010 to accompany the placement of a historic marker honoring Philadelphia-born Lorenzo L. Langstroth at his birthplace at 106 S. Front St. Langstroth invented the first movable frame hive design based on the principle of “bee space.”
Contact the Honeyfest team at honeyfest@phillybeekeepers.org or visit www.facebook.com/Philadelphia-Honey-Festival or https://twitter.com/PhillyHoneyFest for more.

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