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HOME THEATER: ‘Zootopia’ is like ‘Chinatown’ with fuzzy, cuddly animals

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STORY WRITTEN BY AMY LONGSDORF
For Digital First Media

If you’ve ever fantasized about “Chinatown” being remade as a cartoon, check out “Zootopia,” a wonderfully weird and wacky who-dun-it populated by animated animals of all sizes, shapes and species.
Front and center is feisty bunny Judy Hopps (Ginnifer Goodwin), a new graduate of the police academy who teams up with a snarky fox (Jason Bateman) to solve a tricky case involving the disappearance of a handful of predators. Everything works like a charm from the adventurous animation to the film’s smart take on race, gender and crime-solving. On Amazon, iTunes, Google, Vudu.

PHOTO COURTESY OF Disney A scene from "Zootopia." Pictured (L-R): Nick Wilde, Judy Hopps, Mr. Big.

PHOTO COURTESY OF DISNEY
A scene from “Zootopia.” Pictured (L-R): Nick Wilde, Judy Hopps, Mr. Big.

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